Category Archives: World of Work

CV Boosting Tips for Savvy Students

Whether you’re in first year or final year, it’s always good to think about boosting your CV. Potential employers will make a decision based off an A4 sheet of paper, so be prepared to make it look good and don’t sell yourself short.



1) Google Certifications– Google have started to offer free online certifications, from Adwords, Analytics and App certifications, it’s a pretty simple way to stand out from the crowd. Not only does it show a willingness to learn outside of your degree, but it will give you basic skills in each subject that can be applied in the workplace- best of all it’s FREE!

2) Volunteer– volunteering is great as it allows you to donate your time to something you may be passionate about. From helping the homeless, to simply working in your favourite charity shop- donating as little as one hour can make all the difference. Its a great experience where you can meet different people and learn different skills, for volunteering opportunities in Hull click here.

3) Blog– Ironic, eh! But blogging can give employers a taste of your personality and show them where your interests lie. Blogs are a great way to showcase who you are and what you’re about.

Most importantly though, don’t start neglecting your studies! CV boosters should be just that, a small boost to support your university education. For more help and guidance visit The University of Hull Careers and Employability page.



Have you got any CV boosting tips? I’d love to find out!

Campus Event: Inspired in Hull – “The Business of Film”

It is not under dispute that the film industry is big business, but what are the constructs behind the scene?

The Hull University Business School has invited her distinguished alumni, Kieran Breen, the President of International Theatrical Marketing, Twentieth Century Fox, to unveil the mystery of the movie business.

During this campus event, Kieran illustrated the film business value chain, from its production to the screen, as an exciting and risky parachute jumping. The reason for this is that the cost of a movie is usually around 60~100 million U.S. dollars, and the success of the product largely depends on the performance of its initial launch. In other words, it is either a safe landing or a tragic disaster.

He also explained the importance of the international marketplace, the need to understand the consumer in different countries, regions, and territories. And, the marketing divisions in reaching the consumer.

He further explored some of the structural changes impacting the movie business and the implications for the future of the industry. He noted that this business is no longer as profitable as before for a number of reasons. For instance, there are currently more entertainment options than 20 years ago, thus less disposable income will be available for movies. Moreover, China is building stronger political barriers to protect their local business, consequently the foreign film manufacturer can only get 25% of the sales revenue.

Inspired? It would be nice for you to leave some comments! And please find out more at #BusinessOfFilmpic.twitter.com/aHVhkrJrjN.

This blog is reproduced from 2016 by Chanqi Xu