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Study Skills: Strategic approaches that can help you with exams

While exams are commonly acknowledged as painful and troublesome among many students, the ways to counter these problems are becoming increasingly paramount.

With this in mind, here I would like to share a step-by-step personal tactic to deal with all kinds of exam, and hopefully these might aid you with your future study!

1. Know your scope:

It is crucial to know the scope of your exam and the core areas. This is the starting point for effective and efficient revising as the time is limited and consequently you must utilise all your strength on the right direction.

2. Make a revision plan:

Once you have identified your scope and core areas, the next thing is to dissect them into sections and label them with a time frame and priority. Normally, the higher the priority the more the time you need to allocate. And the allocation of time is based on the estimation of your personal strength.

3. Be calm and follow the plan:

When the plan is created, the next step is to follow it! Make sure nothing comes in your way and stop you from reaching the daily objective.

4. Reflect and retain:

The last gap between you and the aim is reflection and retention. It would be frustrating that if you cannot remember anything when it comes to the real deal. So, try to be proactive and reflect on the previous learning at the end of each day, and the science behind this is supported by Hermann Ebbinghaus.

Start to make plans now! Please leave some comments and follow me on twitter for more information! @Chuanqi_Xu

This blog is reproduced from 2016 by Chanqi Xu

Campus Event: Inspired in Hull – “The Business of Film”

It is not under dispute that the film industry is big business, but what are the constructs behind the scene?

The Hull University Business School has invited her distinguished alumni, Kieran Breen, the President of International Theatrical Marketing, Twentieth Century Fox, to unveil the mystery of the movie business.

During this campus event, Kieran illustrated the film business value chain, from its production to the screen, as an exciting and risky parachute jumping. The reason for this is that the cost of a movie is usually around 60~100 million U.S. dollars, and the success of the product largely depends on the performance of its initial launch. In other words, it is either a safe landing or a tragic disaster.

He also explained the importance of the international marketplace, the need to understand the consumer in different countries, regions, and territories. And, the marketing divisions in reaching the consumer.

He further explored some of the structural changes impacting the movie business and the implications for the future of the industry. He noted that this business is no longer as profitable as before for a number of reasons. For instance, there are currently more entertainment options than 20 years ago, thus less disposable income will be available for movies. Moreover, China is building stronger political barriers to protect their local business, consequently the foreign film manufacturer can only get 25% of the sales revenue.

Inspired? It would be nice for you to leave some comments! And please find out more at #BusinessOfFilmpic.twitter.com/aHVhkrJrjN.

This blog is reproduced from 2016 by Chanqi Xu