culture shock for Chinese students live in the UK

Most of expats moving to the UK facing some problems to adjust new environment, especially for culture. There are many differences between west and east culture, in this article, I will talk about culture shock for Chinese who are study in the UK.

  1. No break at noon

    It is normal that you have a lecture at 12am-2pm in the UK. However, there is a lunch break in China. If you tell students they must study during the noon break time, they will against it.


  2. The sensitive fire alarm

    As for Chinese students, the smoke alarm sound is one of sounds which impressed us deeply in the UK. I have been through so many times fire alarm interrupted the class, but without any fire.


  3. People are so polite

    Everyone knows Brits love their manners and it is part of their national identity. Once I talked with a local, and I counted she said 6 times “thank you” within 2 minutes.

    Image result for images great


  4. Not afraid of cold

    No matter how cold in the evening, there are many young girls dressed short skirt queuing in front of pub door. It seems I am not properly dressed.

  5.  Use Separate Hot and Cold Taps

    One thing still confused me is why there are two taps in the bathroom in the UK. Sometimes the water is too hot to use. However, my brilliant Chinese friend came up with this smart idea.


    Do you have any culture shock experiences? Please leave a comment below.

TOP 4 STUDENT DISCOUNT CARDS IN THE UK

It is difficult for most of UK students to managing a busy and independent lifestyle on a tight budget. However, good news is there are many ways to help students save money. Using the following top 5 discount cards offered in the UK.

  1. The 16-25 Railcard (Young person card).

    This card will help you save lots of money in your travel, and it gives 1/3 off for students. The Railcard costs just £30 per year, and if you know you’re going to be doing a lot of travelling over the next 3 years, you can buy a 3-year with only £70.


  2. NUS Extra.

    The NUS Extra card costs £12 per year and let students enjoy a wide range of discount on necessity and leisure items. if you don’t want spend money, you can choose another card—the NUS card, and it’s free.


  3. International Student Identity Card (ISIC)
    International Student Identity Card (ISIC), this card can make you enjoy big discount not only in UK, but also around the world. The ISIC offer over 150,000 discounts in over 130 countries.


  4. YHA membership card.The Youth Hostels Association is a charitable organisation, providing youth hostel accommodation. The membership card only costs £5 per year, and you can enjoy up £3 off per night.

    At last, don’t forget your basic student ID card also act as proof that you have a right to get a discount at a lot of business. So, don’t be shy, ask the staff whether you can get a student discount when you pay the money.

Five Tips for Mobile Photography

It’s more convenient for people to pick up a phone to take a photo rather than using professional camera in our daily life, but if you want to produce some great pictures and gain more LIKEs on social media, here are 5 essential skills you need to know.

  1. Use the rule of central & the rule of third.

    A good composition can make photo to be eye-catching. To put subject in the central of the screen can grab people’s attention.

    The rule of third is another useful composition skill in photography. Using two horizontal lines and two vertical lines to divide up the image, then position the subject in the points where lines meet or along lines.



  2. Do conversion to black and white

    Shoot in colour, do conversion to black and white later. Then you will receive another different meaning.


  3. Hold your phone steadily

    To avoid taking blurry photos, sometimes you should use two hands to hold the phone or you can also put it on solid surface to keep it steady. Of course, you could also use a tripod.

  4. Set the focus is most important

    It is very important to ensure that you subject is in focus. Using your finger to tap the screen where the subject is in the frame. Sometimes, you can also use some apps to edit the photo if you are not happy with photos, like AfterFocus, can blur the background.

  5. Practice makes perfect

    You can’t expect just take one shot and gain the best picture, try to take photos from various angles and distances, and keep practicing.

    If you want to learn more photography skills, you can also visit http://iphonephotographyschool.com/

    All pictures photographed and produced by Jin

East v West: Rugby League Rivalry in Hull

For many Hullensians, football will never compare with rugby league. The thirteen man code (as opposed to the fifteen men a side in rugby union) is a fast game that at its best shows an enjoyable momentum on the pitch that few sports can equal.

Hull is a great place to get into rugby league as it is the only city in the country with a proper derby – that of Hull Kingston Rovers (the Red and Whites) versus Hull FC (the Black and Whites). Traditionally support is split by the River Hull running through the city – FC is west and KR east of the river – and families are often a mix of the two, which has given the game a reputation as a friendly derby.

The Black and Whites win the cup at last (Image: Daily Mail)

There is an added spice to proceedings now as well, after the events of last season – KR losing a relegation play-off in farcical fashion to go down, just weeks after FC won arguably the greatest game in their history, finally winning the Challenge Cup at Wembley after eight failed attempts. That local lad and former captain Lee Radford coached FC to victory made it all the sweeter (three guesses as to my team!).

“Radders” lifts the Challenge Cup after a brilliant victory (Image: RL Fans Hosting)

With KR aiming to get promoted at the first attempt and FC looking to continue their huge improvement over the last few seasons, now is a fine time to start following the sport. Not only is it a huge part of Hull’s culture – it’s also an exciting way to spend eighty minutes.

(Featured image: Sky Sports)

3 tips to boost your productivity for a successful semester

Stressed out by tons of assignments coming constantly? Here are 3 tips to help you reorganise your schedule and study more effectively for a successful semester!

Prioritise based on importance and urgency

In his best-seller “7 Habits of Highly Effective People“, Dr. Stephen R Covey proposed a method of prioritisation that ranks tasks to be done each week based on their levels of importance and urgency. While people normally prioritise both important and urgent tasks first, this problem-minded approach is ineffective in the long term. Instead, we should become more opportunity-minded by focusing on important yet non-urgent tasks, so that our schedule will not be clogged up in the future.

Prioritisation Chart for Effective Time Management

Focus more with the Pomodoro technique

The main principle behind this technique is to break your work time into 25-minute intervals with short breaks of 3 to 10 minutes in between. This technique helps us fully concentrate on the task at hand, especially when we are so often distracted by many things nowadays.

Steps of the Pomodoro Technique

Save time with visual book summaries

Productivity Game is a great collection of short videos which perfectly summarise books with various topics. Whereas these books normally take you weeks to finish, Productivity Game lets you get hold of the books’ most important insights with only around 20 minutes. These videos are also presented in a visually attractive way, making it much easier to follow.

Have you tried any of these methods before? Were they effective? Don’t hesitate to comment your experience below! 

A homeless tour guide for your London visit: Why not?

Think there’s nothing you can learn from a homeless person? Think again! 

Now you can book a tour around some of London’s coolest areas with a homeless tour guide. Pioneered by Unseen Tours – a social enterprise aiming to tackle homelessness in London, this concept has proven to be a huge success with hundreds of positive reviews on TripAdvisor.

So how is a homeless tour actually like? 

I booked a homeless Brick Lane tour during my stay in London in December 2016 out of curiosity. My tour guide was Pete – a previous advertiser who lost his job, became homeless and has had to sleep rough around Brick Lane for over 10 years. Along with his easy-going nature, Pete also wowed me with his extensive knowledge about the cultural and social issues around Brick Lane as well as in England. During the tour, Pete told us mind-blowing stories about the famous criminal Jack the Ripper, the suffrage movement in the early 1900s and the multicultural development of Brick Lane following Jewish and Muslim people’s immigration.

I was also blown away by Brick Lane’s brilliant street arts. Having worked in the advertising industry before, Pete explained to us a great deal about how street artists here cleverly delivered subtle messages of social struggles through their creative artwork.

Brick Lane street arts
Amazing 3D piece of art on the streets of Brick Lane

In short, my experience with the Brick Lane homeless tour went far beyond my expectations. If touristy attractions in London are not what you’re after, Unseen Tours will be perfect for you!

Football vs. Football: Part 3

Football and football: Same name, totally different games. At my first Hull City match, I realised how the fan experience differed from that of American sports. First off, I was fascinated by the fact that security guards separated parts of the crowd because back home, no matter the sport, fans are mixed (for better or for worse).

Next, I realised how the direction of a football match can completely affect whether or not the stadium is full of rowdy fans who are chanting nonstop or spectators who would rather be home. This does not happen in American football because no matter if your team is winning or losing, chances are that you’re being egged on by signs reading “Get Loud!” or you’re caught up in singing along with the soundtrack of Bon Jovi or Queen.

South Park GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

Finally, a staple of American football culture that is not present here in the UK is tailgating, which is when fans park in a giant lot and cook from grills that they have brought from home; most of the time, drinking, loud music, and trash talking is involved (all in the love of sport). While both sports have their highs and lows, I will always defend American football and will never regret staying up until 4:30 Berlin time to watch my team win another Super Bowl (GO PATRIOTS!).

I hope you’ve enjoyed the 3rd and final part of my “New England vs. England” series. Comment below with your favourite sporting experiences!

 

A Winter Without Ice: Part 2

Growing up in Massachusetts has taught me to deal with all sorts of weather, from days that are below freezing to others that are so hot you can feel the tar on the driveway melting under your feet. This variety has led New Englanders to take on some habits that seem odd to the rest of the US, let alone other countries, so being out of my element has forced me to adapt to my new environment. For example, the temperature back home is currently 22°F (-6°C), but that will not stop anyone from rolling out of bed to get an iced coffee from Dunkin Donuts. Yes, you read that right: iced coffee.

Donuts GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

So imagine my surprise when, in October, I went to order an iced tea and was told that this item, along with others, were not on the menu for the time being because it was getting colder outside. In that moment, all I could think about was all of the blizzards I have driven in to get an iced coffee, so cold weather could not deter me. While I have struggled without iced coffee this winter, something I have appreciated is the lack of snow and not having to shovel myself out of the house like the rest of my family (sorry, guys!).

Snowpocalypse 2015 aka Winter Storm Juno

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed Part 2 of my “New England vs. England” series. Comment below with any regional habits that may have been put into question while traveling!

Re-learning the English Language: Tales of a Fluent *American* English Speaker: Part 1

Have you ever spoken the same language as somebody else but still felt lost in translation? Before I studied abroad in 2014, I thought the only difference between the UK and US would be the accents, but how wrong I was! A few days into my semester, I had my first experience hanging out with my friend’s British flatmates and almost right away, I was berated for calling ‘crisps’, ‘chips’.

From this moment on, I tried to fall into a pattern of calling everything by its British name so that I wouldn’t get yelled at but while some things came easily, others never quite stuck. Here is a list of words and their UK-US translations (Note: Some US translations are strictly New England/Massachusetts-based and may not apply to all 50 states).

  • Fries= Chips
  • Bubbler=Water fountain
  • Rotary=Roundabout
  • Jimmies= Sprinkles
  • Cookout=Barbeque
  • Sidewalk=Pavement
  • Crosswalk=Zebra crossing
  • Sweater=Jumper
  • Shopping cart=Trolley
  • Cookie= Biscuit
  • Elevator=Lift
  • Soccer=Football
  • Football=American football
  • First floor=Ground floor
  • Pants=Trousers
    • Fun fact: I told a class full of Brits that I had just bought a new pair of pants and did not realise my error until somebody was intuitive enough to understand that I meant jeans, not underwear…

 BONUS: Words that look similar or the same but manage to get me in trouble every time.

  • Aluminum=Aluminium
  • Mocha (Moe-ka)=Mocha (Mawcka)

Confused? You’re not alone!

I hope you’ve enjoyed Part 1 of my “New England vs. England” series. Comment below with other pairings you may have heard of or any mishaps caused by same-language mistranslation!

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